Joel Brockner: Procedural Fairness, It’s a Good Deal

Mike interviews Joel Brockner about a 20+ year stream of research on procedural fairness. Joel summarizes numerous studies that showed how the fairness of an organization’s policies and procedures for making and communicating decisions is one of the most important factors in determining employee attitudes and behaviors.

Joel Brockner

Joel Brockner ( jb54@columbia.edu ) is the Phillip Hettleman Professor of Business and Chair of the Management Division in the Business School at Columbia University in New York. Within the broader field of organizational behavior, Joel is well known for his work in several areas, including the effects of organizational downsizing on the productivity and morale of the “survivors,” management of organizational change, self processes in organizations and managerial judgment and decision making.

Recommended further readings:

  • Brockner, J. (2002). Making sense of procedural fairness: How high procedural fairness can reduce or heighten the influence of outcome favorability. Academy of Management Review, 27, 58-76.
  • Brockner, J. (2006). Why it’s so hard to be fair. Harvard Business Review, 84, 122-129.
  • Brockner, J., & Wiesenfeld, B.M. (1996). An integrative framework for explaining reactions to decisions: The interactive effects of outcomes and procedures. Psychological Bulletin, 120, 189-208.
  • Colquitt, J. A. (2004). Does the justice of the one interact with the justice of the many? Reactions to procedural justice in teams. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89, 633-646.
  • Cropanzano, R., Bowen, D. E., & Gilliland, S. W. (2007). The management of organizational justice. Academy of Management Perspectives, 21, 34-48.
  • Lind, E. A., Kulik, C. T., Ambrose, M., & Deverapark, M.V. (1993). Individual and corporate dispute resolution: Using procedural fairness as a decision heuristic. Administrative Science Quarterly, 38, 224-251.

Michael Johnson

Michael Johnson is an Assistant Professor in Department of Management and Organization at the University of Washington. He can be reached via mdj3@u.washington.edu